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Anti-hyperuricemia bioactive peptides: a review on obtaining, activity, and mechanism of action.

Food & Function 2024 May 17
Hyperuricemia, a disorder of uric acid metabolism, serves as a significant risk factor for conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal failure, and various metabolic syndromes. The main contributors to hyperuricemia include overproduction of uric acid in the liver or impaired excretion in the kidneys. Despite traditional clinical drugs being employed for its treatment, significant health concerns persist. Recently, there has been growing interest in utilizing protein peptides sourced from diverse food origins to mitigate hyperuricemia. This article provides a comprehensive review of bioactive peptides with anti-hyperuricemia properties derived from animals, plants, and their products. We specifically outline the methods for preparing these peptides from food proteins and elucidate their efficacy and mechanisms in combating hyperuricemia, supported by in vitro and in vivo evidence. Uric acid-lowering peptides offer promising prospects due to their safer profile, enhanced efficacy, and improved bioavailability. Therefore, this review underscores significant advancements and contributions in identifying peptides capable of metabolizing purine and/or uric acid, thereby alleviating hyperuricemia. Moreover, it offers a theoretical foundation for the development of functional foods incorporating uric acid-lowering peptides.

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