Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Clinical and Molecular Correlates of the Index of Severity for Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

BACKGROUND: The Index of Severity for Eosinophilic Esophagitis (I-SEE) is a new expert-defined clinical tool that classifies disease severity of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE).

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine whether I-SEE is associated with patient characteristics and/or molecular features of EoE.

METHODS: We analyzed a prospective cohort of patients with EoE from the Consortium of Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disease Researchers (CEGIR). Associations between I-SEE and clinical and molecular features (EoE Diagnostic Panel [EDP]) were assessed.

RESULTS: In 318 patients with chronic EoE (adults 209, children 109), the median total I-SEE score was 7.0, with a higher symptoms and complications score in children than adults (4.0 vs. 1.0; P < .001) and higher inflammatory and fibrostenotic features scores in adults than children (3.0 vs. 1.0 and 3.0 vs. 0.0, respectively; both P < .001). Total I-SEE score had a bimodal distribution with the inactive to moderate categories and severe category. EDP score correlated with total I-SEE score (r = -0.352, P < .001) and both inflammatory and fibrostenotic features scores (r = -0.665, P< .001; r = -0.446, P < .001, respectively), but not with symptoms and complications scores (r = 0.047, P = .408). Molecular severity increased from inactive to mild and moderate, but not severe categories. Longitudinal changes of modified I-SEE scores and inflammatory and fibrostenotic features scores reflected the histologic and molecular activity.

CONCLUSIONS: I-SEE associated with select clinical features across severity categories and with EoE molecular features for non-severe categories, warranting further validation.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app