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Lactobacillus casei-fermented Amomum xanthioides ameliorates metabolic dysfunction in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

Amomum xanthioides (AX) has been used as an edible herbal medicine to treat digestive system disorders in Asia. Additionally, Lactobacillus casei is a well-known probiotic commonly used in fermentation processes as a starter. The current study aimed to investigate the potential of Lactobacillus casei-fermented Amomum xanthioides (LAX) in alleviating metabolic disorders induced by high-fat diet (HFD) in a mouse model. LAX significantly reduced the body and fat weight, outperforming AX, yet without suppressing appetite. LAX also markedly ameliorated excessive lipid accumulation and reduced inflammatory cytokine (IL-6) levels in serum superior to AX in association with UCP1 activation and adiponectin elevation. Furthermore, LAX noticeably improved the levels of fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, and HOMA-IR through positive regulation of glucose transporters (GLUT2, GLUT4), and insulin receptor gene expression. In conclusion, the fermentation of AX demonstrates a pronounced mitigation of overnutrition-induced metabolic dysfunction, including hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and obesity, compared to non-fermented AX. Consequently, we proposed that the fermentation of AX holds promise as a potential candidate for effectively ameliorating metabolic disorders.

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