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[Acquired foot drop].

A dropping foot is the consequence of a variety of debilitating conditions and is oftentimes treated conservatively by general practitioners and other specialists. Typically, it is caused by peroneal nerve palsy secondary to compression or a hernia nucleosipulpei at the level L4-L5. Identifying the underlying pathology requires a neurological work-up oftentimes including ultrasound and electromyographic investigation. When a peroneal nerve compression is found, decompression can be achieved operatively. Should the underlying cause of the dropping foot have been treated adequately without an effect on the foot itself, then a posterior tibial tendon transfer may be considered. Generally, a posterior tibial tendon transfer has good outcomes for the treatment of dropping foot although it is partly dependent on the physiotherapy that accompanies it.

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