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Pharmacist intervention is associated with fewer serious falls over 3 months among older fallers at a day hospital: A quasi-experimental study.

Maturitas 2024 May 11
OBJECTIVES: Some drugs increase the risk of falls, including serious falls. The objective of this quasi-experimental study was to determine whether the intervention of a clinical pharmacist among older outpatients receiving a multifactorial fall prevention program at a geriatric day hospital dedicated to older patients with a recent history of falls was effective in preventing serious falls over a 3-month follow-up, compared with usual care.

STUDY DESIGN: Quasi-experimental study in 296 consecutive older outpatients, including 85 with pharmacist intervention (the intervention group) and 148 without (the control group).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The main outcome was the occurrence of at least one serious fall within 3 months of follow-up. Covariates included age, sex, body mass index, grip strength, history of falls, Mini-Mental State Examination score, use of ≥3 drugs associated with risk of falls, frailty, and disability.

RESULTS: Fewer participants in the intervention group experienced at least one serious fall than in the control group (5 (5.9 %) versus 23 (15.5 %), P = 0.029), which persisted after adjustment for potential confounding factors (OR = 0.30 [95CI:0.11-0.84], P = 0.022). No significant effect was found on the indicence of all falls. Pharmacist intervention allowed more frequent therapeutic optimizations of antithrombotics (OR = 3.69 [95CI: 1.66-8.20]), proton pump inhibitors (OR = 3.34 [95CI: 1.31-8.50]), benzodiazepines (OR = 3.15 [95CI: 1.06-9.36]) and antidepressants (OR = 3.87 [95CI: 1.21-12.35]).

CONCLUSIONS: Among older fallers receiving a multifactorial fall prevention program at a day hospital, a clinical pharmacist intervention was associated with fewer incident serious falls over 3 months of follow-up.

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