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Primary Cutaneous CD4+ Small/Medium T-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorders (SMPLPD), demographical, clinical, therapeutic and prognostic aspects: a retrospective monocentric analysis.

Primary Cutaneous CD4+ Small/Medium T-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorders (SMPLPD), also known as PCS-TCLPD, represent a rare group of hematologic diseases primarily affecting the skin. In this retrospective single-centre case series study, we aimed to investigate the demographic, clinical, therapeutic, and prognostic aspects of SMPLPD. We collected data from cases diagnosed between 2010 and the present, employing histopathological and immunohistochemical methods following WHO criteria. We included 22 patients with a median age of 61.50 years and median time between clinical onset and diagnosis of 3.00 months. Surgical excision with conservative margins was the primary choice, showing clinical remission in 17 cases, while non-surgical treatments, including radiotherapy, high-potency steroid treatment and ablative laser, achieved clinical remission in four cases. Clinical presentations varied, but the most common one was a single violaceous nodule/papule on upper body parts. In conclusion, our single-centre case series provides valuable insights into SMPLPD, highlighting the effectiveness of surgical treatments and the potential of non-surgical ones. Even if controversial, the benign nature of SMPLPD emphasizes the importance of achieving tumour clearance with acceptable aesthetic outcomes.

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