Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Enhanced recovery after chest wall resection and reconstruction: a clinical practice review.

Since the late 1990s, and Henrik Kehlet's hypothesis that a reduction of the body's stress response to major surgeries could decrease postoperative morbidity, "Enhanced Recovery After Surgery" (ERAS) care pathways have been streamlined. They are now well accepted and considered standard in many surgical disciplines. Yet, to this day, there is no specific ERAS protocol for chest wall resections (CWRs), the removal of a full-thickness portion of the chest wall, including muscle, bone and possibly skin. This is most unfortunate because these are high-risk surgeries, which carry high morbidity rates. In this review, we propose an overview of the current key elements of the ERAS guidelines for thoracic surgery that might apply to CWRs. A successful ERAS pathway for CWR patients would entail, as is the standard approach, three parts: pre-, peri- and postoperative elements. Preoperative items would include specific information, targeted patient education, involvement of all members of the team, including the plastic surgeons, smoking cessation, dedicated nutrition and carbohydrate loading. Perioperative items would likely be standard for thoracotomy patients, namely carefully selective pre-anesthesia sedative medication only in some rare instances, low-molecular-weight heparin throughout, antibiotic prophylaxis, minimization of postoperative nausea and vomiting, avoidance of fluid overload and of urinary drainage. Postoperative elements would include early mobilization and feeding, swift discontinuation of intravenous fluid supply and chest tube removal as soon as safe. Optimal pain management throughout also appears to be critical to minimize the risk of respiratory complications. Together, all these items are achievable and may hold the key to successful introduction of ERAS pathways to the benefit of CWR patients.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app