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An aggressive soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremity: A myxofibrosarcoma, grade 3 (FNCLCC system).

We report a case of myxofibrosarcoma of the posterior region of the femur, part of the group of soft-tissue sarcomas: a set of rare and heterogeneous tumors with various subtypes and different prognostic. It is characterized by local infiltrative activity and an extremely high rate of local recurrence. A 58-year-old man came to the Radiology Department to examine a voluminous round and expansive formation of the posterior thigh region. The patient stated that the mass had grown suddenly for about 3 months, maybe after a trauma, increasing in volume exponentially and causing him discomfort, embarrassment, and pain. The result of the first diagnostic approach, with the US, was unexpected and suspicious, and the radiologist wanted to do first a CT, and then maybe plan an MRI. The CT revealed an inhomogeneous density formation and in MRI the mass resulted to be compatible, with the radiologic pattern, with the diagnosis of a sarcoma of the soft tissue. The physicians had already alerted the pathological anatomy, as they suspected something malignant. So, some days after the MRI examination, the patient underwent histological sampling, confirming the suspicion: a myxofibrosarcoma (stage III) of the posterior region of the femoral region. The patient started on radio and chemotherapy, which increases survival and in the hope of reducing the size of the mass, and a strict follow-up was posed before doing the surgery.

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