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Kissing choroidal sign: A case report.

Choroidal detachment (CD) is a rare and potentially vision-threatening complication of glaucoma surgery. Inflammation and prolonged ocular hypotony can promote fluid accumulation between the choroid and sclera. Risk factors include trauma, advanced age, use of anticoagulant medications, systemic hypertension, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. CD ultrasound findings will show 2 layers, detaching as far anteriorly as the ciliary bodies, that protrude convexly into the vitreous without extending to the optic disc, often described as the appositional or kissing choroidal sign. In contrast, retinal detachments will show a distinct "V" shape due to the retina's fixation to the optic nerve head posteriorly. In the case of hemorrhagic CD, therapy should be targeted at reducing intraocular pressure. In this case, the patient was started on atropine and prednisolone drops and discontinued on all glaucoma medications in the left eye. While serous choroidal detachments are usually benign, persistent choroidal effusions may cause significant morbidity with hemorrhagic CD having a worse prognosis. Point of care ultrasound can help emergency physicians quickly distinguish between choroidal and retinal detachments and thus guide management in a safe and timely manner.

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