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Endovascular embolization of Spetzler-Martin Grade I brain arteriovenous malformations: A case report on patient-centered neurointervention.

Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVM) present complex treatment decisions, particularly for low-grade AVM where surgical resection is often considered the standard. This case report emphasizes the importance of patient preferences and cultural considerations in selecting endovascular embolization over traditional surgical approaches for Spetzler-Martin Grade I AVM management, highlighting the evolving practice of patient-centered care in neurointervention. A 30-year-old male presented with recurrent seizures, characterized by a sudden onset of headache followed by speech arrest, without any preceding medical history of neurological deficits. Initial physical examination revealed no focal neurological deficits. Non-contrast computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance angiography suggested an AVM involving the cortical-subcortical regions of the left frontal lobe, measuring approximately 1.7 × 2.6 × 1.5 cm, fed by the left middle cerebral artery M3 segment, and draining into the superior sagittal sinus. Spetzler-Martin Grade I classification was confirmed via digital subtraction angiography. Given the patient's strong preference against invasive procedures, driven by personal and cultural beliefs, endovascular embolization was selected as the treatment strategy. Post-embolization, the patient showed marked symptomatic improvement with no evidence of residual AVM on follow-up imaging, and no postprocedure complications were reported. This case highlights the importance of considering patient preferences in AVM treatment planning, illustrating that endovascular embolization can be an effective and less invasive alternative to surgery in selected patients, reinforcing the need for personalized, patient-centered approaches in neurointerventional care.

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