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Moxidectin versus Ivermectin in the prevention and treatment of acute and chronic experimental trichinellosis spiralis.

The limited activity of the traditional medications against T. spiralis encysted larvae handicaps complete cure of trichinellosis till now due to decreased permeability and absorption through tissues. MOX is listed worldwide for prevention and treatment of several internal and external nematodes. Consequently, the aim of this work was to investigate the effect of moxidectin versus ivermectin on experimental acute and chronic trichinellosis and to illuminate the potential mechanisms of their effects. 105 Mice were divided into four groups; Group I: Uninfected healthy control; Group II: Infected untreated control; Group III: infected and treated with IVM and Group IV: infected and treated with MOX. The groups (II, III and IV) were later subdivided equally into three subgroups (a, b, and c) according to the stage of treatment. Parasitological counting of adults and larvae besides immune-histopathological examination of intestines and muscles were done. Results exhibited that both IVM and MOX succeeded in reducing adults and larvae counts with higher potential of MOX in both intestinal and muscle phase. The preeminence of MOX was indicated by decreased inflammation, a significant reduction in the microvascular density (CD31 immunostaining) as well as a reduction in the percentage of fibroblast activation protein (FAP) immunostaining in muscle tissues. Accordingly, the current work recommends moxidectin as an innovative treatment for trichinellosis.

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