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Towards zebrafish models to unravel translational insights of obsessive-compulsive disorder: a neurobehavioral perspective.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic and debilitating illness that has been considered a polygenic and multifactorial disorder, challenging effective therapeutic interventions. Although invaluable advances have been obtained from human and rodent studies, several molecular and mechanistic aspects of OCD etiology are still obscure. Thus, the use of non-traditional animal models may foster innovative approaches in this field, aiming to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of disease from an evolutionary perspective. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has been increasingly considered a powerful organism in translational neuroscience research, especially due to the intrinsic features of the species. Here, we outline target mechanisms of OCD for translational research, and discuss how zebrafish-based models can contribute to explore neurobehavioral aspects resembling those found in OCD. We also identify possible advantages and limitations of potential zebrafish-based models, as well as outline future directions in both etiological and therapeutic research. Lastly, we reinforce the use of zebrafish as a promising tool to unravel the biological bases of OCD, as well as novel pharmacological therapies in the field.

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