Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Transparent layer constancy improves with increased naturalness of the scene.

Vision Research 2024 May 11
The extent to which hue, saturation, and transmittance of thin light-transmitting layers are perceived as constant when the illumination changes (transparent layer constancy, TLC) has previously been investigated with simple stimuli in asymmetric matching tasks. In this task, a target filter is presented under one illumination and a second filter is matched under a second illumination. Although two different illuminations are applied in the stimulus generation, there is no guarantee that the stimulus will be interpreted appropriately by the visual system. In previous work, we found a higher degree of TLC when both illuminations were presented alternately than when they were presented simultaneously, which could be explained, for example, by an increased plausibility of an illumination change. In this work, we test whether TLC can also be increased in simultaneous presentation when the filter's belonging to a particular illumination context is made more likely by additional cues. To this end, we presented filters in differently lit areas of complex, naturalistically rendered 3D scenes containing different types of cues to the prevailing illumination, such as scene geometry, object shading, and cast shadows. We found higher degrees of TLC in such complex scenes than in colorimetrically similar simple 2D color mosaics, which is consistent with the results of similar studies in the area of color constancy. To test which of the illumination cues available in the scenes are actually used, the different types of cues were successively removed from the naturalistically rendered complex scene. A total of eight levels of scene complexity were examined. As expected, TLC decreased the more cues were removed. Object shading and illumination gradients due to shadow cast were both found to have a positive effect on TLC. A second filter had a small positive effect on TLC when added in strongly reduced scenes, but not in the complex scenes that already provide many cues about the illumination context of the filter.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app