Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) and clinical outcomes in dialysis patients.

BACKGROUND: Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), a factor accelerating the degradation of LDL receptors, was associated with a gender-dependent risk for cardiovascular (CV) events in the general population and with all-cause and CV mortality in two relatively small studies in black Africans and South Korean haemodialysis patients. The effect modification by gender was untested in these studies.

METHODS: The study enrolled 1188 dialysis patients from the Prospective Registry of The Working Group of Epidemiology of Dialysis Region Calabria (PROGREDIRE) cohort. PCSK9 was measured by colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The primary outcomes were all-cause and CV mortality. Statistical analysis included Cox regression analysis and effect modification analysis.

RESULTS: During a median 2.9-year follow-up, out of 494 deaths, 278 were CV-related. In unadjusted analyses, PCSK9 levels correlated with increased all-cause (HRfor1ln unit increase : 1.23, 95% CI 1.06-1.43, p =.008) and CV mortality (HRfor1ln unit increase : 1.26, 95% CI 1.03-1.54, p =.03). After multivariate adjustment, these associations were no longer significant (all-cause mortality, HRfor 1 ln unit increase : 1.16, 95% CI .99-1.36, p =.07; CV mortality, HRfor1ln unit increase : 1.18, 95% CI .95-1.46, p =.14). However, in fully adjusted interaction analyses, a doubling in the risk of this outcome in women was registered (Women, HRfor1ln unit increase : 1.88, 95% CI 1.27-2.78, p =.002; Men, HRfor1ln unit increase : 1.07, 95% CI .83-1.38, p =.61; p for effect modification: .02).

CONCLUSIONS: PCSK9 levels are unrelated to all-cause mortality in haemodialysis patients but, like in studies of the general population, independently of other risk factors, entail a doubling in the risk of CV events in women in this population.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app