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Bilateral adrenal cortical rests: An interesting innocuous intruder in the fallopian tubes.

Ectopic adrenal rests refer to the presence of adrenal tissue outside its normal anatomical location and are usually discovered incidentally on microscopic examination. Literature suggests its occurrence in diverse extrarenal sites, like the genitourinary system and pelvis. Our case describes the rare occurrence of ectopic adrenal rests in the walls of bilateral fallopian tubes of a 43-year-old female patient who presented with a complaint of heavy menstrual bleeding. A total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. Gross examination revealed adenomyosis with multiple fibroids, and the same was confirmed on microscopy. Additionally, the finding of a well-encapsulated lesion on the walls of both tubes made us relook at the fallopian tubes, which showed a small bright yellow area measuring less than 0.3 cm in the walls, which was consistent with ectopic adrenal rests after ruling out the morphological differentials of Walthard cell nests, aggregates of foamy histiocytes, metastatic renal clear cell carcinoma, displaced ovarian luteinized theca cells, heterotopia of ovarian hilus cells. Immunohistochemistry showed positivity for Melan A and CK7 was negative. The present case helps in investigating the lesser-explored aspect of adrenal rest pathology. It also reiterates need for detailed observation of fallopian tubectomy specimens by pathologists during grossing to avoid overlooking of potentially intriguing entities.

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