Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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A Competing Risk Nomogram for Prediction of Prognosis in Patients With Primary Squamous Cell Thyroid Carcinoma.

Objective: Primary squamous cell thyroid carcinoma (PSCTC) is an extremely rare carcinoma, accounting for less than 1% of all thyroid carcinomas. However, the factors contributing to PSCTC outcomes remain unclear. This study aimed to identify the prognostic factors and develop a prognostic predictive model for patients with PSCTC. Methods: The analysis included patients diagnosed with thyroid carcinoma between 1975 and 2016 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. Prognostic differences among the 5 pathological types of thyroid carcinomas were analyzed. To determine prognostic factors in PSCTC patients, the Cox regression model and Fine-Gray competing risk model were utilized. Based on the Fine-Gray competing risk model, a nomogram was established for predicting the prognosis of patients with PSCTC. Results: A total of 198,757 thyroid carcinoma patients, including 218 PSCTC patients, were identified. We found that PSCTC and anaplastic thyroid cancer had the worst prognosis among the 5 pathological types of thyroid carcinoma ( P  < .001). According to univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses, age (71-95 years) was an independent risk factor for poorer overall survival and disease-specific survival in PSCTC patients. Using Fine-Gray regression analysis, the total number of in situ/malignant tumors for patient (Number 1) (≥2) was identified as an independent protective factor for prognosis of PSCTC. The area under the curve, the concordance index (C-index), calibration curves and decision curve analysis revealed that the nomogram was capable of predicting the prognosis of PSCTC patients accurately. Conclusion: The competing risk nomogram is highly accurate in predicting prognosis for patients with PSCTC, which may help clinicians to optimize individualized treatment decisions.

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