Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Identification of Breast Cancer Subtypes Based on Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Related Genes and Analysis of Prognosis and Immune Microenvironment in Breast Cancer Patients.

Introduction: Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) was a response to the accumulation of unfolded proteins and plays a crucial role in the development of tumors, including processes such as tumor cell invasion, metastasis, and immune evasion. However, the specific regulatory mechanisms of ERS in breast cancer (BC) remain unclear. Methods: In this study, we analyzed RNA sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) for breast cancer and identified 8 core genes associated with ERS: ELOVL2, IFNG, MAP2K6, MZB1, PCSK6, PCSK9, IGF2BP1, and POP1. We evaluated their individual expression, independent diagnostic, and prognostic values in breast cancer patients. A multifactorial Cox analysis established a risk prognostic model, validated with an external dataset. Additionally, we conducted a comprehensive assessment of immune infiltration and drug sensitivity for these genes. Results: The results indicate that these eight core genes play a crucial role in regulating the immune microenvironment of breast cancer (BRCA) patients. Meanwhile, an independent diagnostic model based on the expression of these eight genes shows limited independent diagnostic value, and its independent prognostic value is unsatisfactory, with the time ROC AUC values generally below 0.5. According to the results of logistic regression neural networks and risk prognosis models, when these eight genes interact synergistically, they can serve as excellent biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of breast cancer patients. Furthermore, the research findings have been confirmed through qPCR experiments and validation. Conclusion: In conclusion, we explored the mechanisms of ERS in BRCA patients and identified 8 outstanding biomolecular diagnostic markers and prognostic indicators. The research results were double-validated using the GEO database and qPCR.

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