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Ascorbic acid supplementation improves adolescent stress-induced cognitive impairment through restoration of behavioral, biochemical and electrophysiological alterations in male rats.

Neuroscience 2024 May 7
The present research study aimed to investigate the role of Ascorbic acid (AA) on synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory impairment induced by unpredicted chronic mild stress (CUMS) in adolescent male rats. Adolescent male rats were divided into:1) vehicle, 2) CUMS, 3-5) CUMS plus various doses of AA by oral gavage (CUMS-10/100/400 mg/kg), and 6) AA400 mg/kg by oral gavage. In Morris Water Maze, the time latency decreased, while the time spent in the target quadrant increased in CUMS group treated with AA at the dose of 400 mg/kg. In passive avoidance, the latency of entering into the dark chamber decreased in CUMS group treated with AA (400 mg/kg). In biochemical test results, nitrite and MDA significantly decreased, while thiol content, SOD, and catalase activity in CUMS group that received AA400mg/kg was increased. IL-10, BDNF and Ki67 increased, while TNF-a and AChE activity were decreased in CUMS group treated with AA simultaneously. The results of our study showed that chronic stress during adolescence could cause learning and memory disorders as well as synaptic plasticity. In addition, we showed that AA can prevent this problem by reducing oxidative stress, inflammation, increasing the amount of BDNF, and neurogenesis.

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