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Degradation of TRIM32 is induced by RTA for Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic replication.

UNLABELLED: TRIM32 is often aberrantly expressed in many types of cancers. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is linked with several human malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma and primary effusion lymphomas (PELs). Increasing evidence has demonstrated the crucial role of KSHV lytic replication in viral tumorigenesis. However, the role of TRIM32 in herpesvirus lytic replication remains unclear. Here, we reveal that the expression of TRIM32 is upregulated by KSHV in latency, and reactivation of KSHV lytic replication leads to the inhibition of TRIM32 in PEL cells. Strikingly, RTA, the master regulator of lytic replication, interacts with TRIM32 and dramatically promotes TRIM32 for degradation via the proteasome systems. Inhibition of TRIM32 induces cell apoptosis and in turn inhibits the proliferation and colony formation of KSHV-infected PEL cells and facilitates the reactivation of KSHV lytic replication and virion production. Thus, our data imply that the degradation of TRIM32 is vital for the lytic activation of KSHV and is a potential therapeutic target for KSHV-associated cancers.

IMPORTANCE: TRIM32 is associated with many cancers and viral infections; however, the role of TRIM32 in viral oncogenesis remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that the expression of TRIM32 is elevated by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) in latency, and RTA (the master regulator of lytic replication) induces TRIM32 for proteasome degradation upon viral lytic reactivation. This finding provides a potential therapeutic target for KSHV-associated cancers.

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