Journal Article
Review
Systematic Review
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A Systematic Review on Effects of Nitrogen Fertilizer Levels on Cabbage ( Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) Production in Ethiopia.

Cabbage ( Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) holds significant agricultural and nutritional importance in Ethiopia; yet, its production faces challenges, including suboptimal nitrogen fertilizer management. The aim of this review was to review the possible effect of nitrogen fertilizer levels on the production of cabbage in Ethiopia. Nitrogen fertilization significantly influences cabbage yield and quality. Moderate to high levels of nitrogen application enhance plant growth, leaf area, head weight, and yield. However, excessive nitrogen levels can lead to adverse effects such as delayed maturity, increased susceptibility to pests and diseases, and reduced postharvest quality. In Ethiopia, small-scale farmers use different nitrogen levels for cabbage cultivation. In Ethiopia, NPSB or NPSBZN fertilizers are widely employed for the growing of various crops such as cabbage. 242 kg of NPS and 79 kg of urea are the blanket recommendation for the current production of cabbage in Ethiopia. The existing rate is not conducive for farmers. Therefore, small-scale farmers ought to utilize an optimal and cost-effective nitrogen rate to boost the cabbage yield. Furthermore, the effectiveness of nitrogen fertilization is influenced by various factors including the soil type, climate, cabbage variety, and agronomic practices. Integrated nutrient management approaches, combining nitrogen fertilizers with organic amendments or other nutrients, have shown promise in optimizing cabbage production while minimizing environmental impacts. The government ought to heed suggestions concerning soil characteristics such as the soil type, fertility, and additional factors such as the soil pH level and soil moisture contents.

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