Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Berberine inhibits the malignant cell phenotype by inactivating PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

BACKGROUND: Berberine is an active compound found in different herbs used in Chinese medicine and is well-known for its potential anticancer properties. The study aimed to figure out the role of berberine in regulating the malignant behavior of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) cells.

METHODS: LSCC cell lines (SNU-899 and AMC-HN-8) were treated with different concentrations of berberine (0-200 μM) to determine its cytotoxicity. The migration, invasion, and apoptosis of LSCC cells were measured by wound healing assays, Transwell assays, and flow cytometry. Western blot was performed for the quantification of proteins involved in PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling.

RESULTS: The viability of LSCC cells was dose-dependently reduced by berberine. Berberine dampened LSCC cell migration and invasion while augmenting cell apoptosis, as evidenced by a reduced wound closure rate, a decrease in invaded cell number, and a surge in cell apoptosis in the context of berberine stimulation. Importantly, the effects of berberine on the cancer cell process were enhanced by LY294002 (an inhibitor for PI3K) treatment. Moreover, the protein levels of phosphorylated PI3K, AKT, and mTOR were markedly reduced in response to berberine treatment.

CONCLUSION: Berberine inhibits cell viability, migration, and invasion but augments cell apoptosis by inactivating PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling in LSCC.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app