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Myeloid-derived growth factor ameliorates dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis by regulating macrophage polarization.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by inflammatory conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. According to reports, IBD prevalence is increasing globally, with heavy economic and physical burdens. Current IBD clinical treatment is limited to pharmacological methods; therefore, new strategies are needed. Myeloid-derived growth factor (MYDGF) secreted by bone marrow-derived mononuclear macrophages has beneficial effects in multiple inflammatory diseases. To this end, the present study aimed to establish an experimental IBD mouse model using dextran sulfate sodium in drinking water. MYDGF significantly alleviated DSS-induced colitis, suppressed lymphocyte infiltration, restored epithelial integrity in mice, and decreased apoptosis in the colon tissue. Moreover, the number of M1 macrophages was decreased and that of M2 macrophages was increased by the action of MYDGF. In MYDGF-treated mice, the NF-κB and MAPK pathways were partially inhibited. Our findings indicate that MYDGF could mitigate DSS-induced mice IBD by reducing inflammation and restoring epithelial integrity through regulation of intestinal macrophage polarization via NF-κB and MAPK pathway inhibition. KEY MESSAGES: MYDGF alleviated DSS-induced acute colitis. MYDGF maintains colon epithelial barrier integrity and relieves inflammation. MYDGF regulates colon macrophage polarization. MYDGF partially inhibited the activation of NF-κB and MAPK pathway.

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