Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Systematic Review
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Return to Sport at Preinjury Level is Common After Surgical Treatment of SLAP Lesions: A Systematic Review and a Meta-analysis.

BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing surgery for Superior-Labrum-anterior-to-posterior (SLAP) lesions are often worried about their return to sport performance. This systematic review determined the rate of return to sport and return to sport at the previous level (RTSP) after surgery for SLAP lesion.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: The PRISMA guidelines were followed. Meta-analysis of data through forest plot projections was conducted. Studies were divided and analyzed according to the type of interventions (isolated slap repair or SLAP repair with rotator cuff debridement and biceps tenodesis).

RESULTS: The mean overall rate of return to sport after the procedures was 90.6% and the mean overall rate of return to sport at the previous level after the procedures was 71.7%. RTSP rates of the whole population were 71% (95% CI: 60%-80%), 66% (95% CI: 49%-79%), and 78% (95% CI: 67%-87%) for isolated SLAP repair, SLAP repair with the rotator cuff debridement and biceps tenodesis, respectively. A lack of subgroup analysis for the specific performance demand or type of lesion related to the surgical technique used might induce a high risk of bias.

DISCUSSION: Return to sports at the previous level after surgically treated superior labrum anterior to posterior lesion is possible and highly frequent, with the highest rates of RTSP in patients treated with biceps tenodesis. More studies and better-designed trials are needed to enrich the evidence on indications of SLAP surgical treatment in relation to specific sports-level demand.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level-IV.

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