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Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab as first-line treatment in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A long-term analysis of the German CLL Study Group (GCLLSG) registry.

Long-term data of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients with favorable risk who were treated with fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR) within clinical trials show good efficacy. We here report long-term data collected within the GCLLSG registry. Altogether, 417 CLL patients who received first-line treatment with FCR were analyzed, of which 293 (70.3%) were treated outside of clinical trials. The median observation time from first-line was 95.8 (interquartile range 58.7-126.8) months. Focusing on data of 194 (46.5%) patients who received FCR first-line treatment after 2013 (start of data collection within GCLLSG registry), responses were documented in 85% of the patients, non-responses in 15%, and for 3.6% the assessment was missing. Median event-free survival (EFS, time until disease progression, subsequent treatment, or death) was 60.2 months with a 5-year EFS-rate of 50.6%. Patients with higher-risk disease, characterized by unmutated IGHV (N = 78), had a median EFS of 45.4 months with a 5-year EFS rate of 36.3%, while the median EFS was 77.5 months with a 5-year EFS rate of 60.3% in patients with mutated IGHV (N = 40). Median overall survival was not reached with a 5-year survival rate of 92.7%. In summary, first-line FCR was associated with long EFS, especially in patients exhibiting a mutated IGHV status.

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