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Impaired esophagogastric junction relaxation and lung transplantation outcomes.

The implications of impaired esophagogastric junction relaxation (i.e. esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction and achalasia) in lung transplants recipients (LTRs) are unclear. Thus, we examined the prevalence and clinical outcomes of LTRs with an abnormally elevated integrated relaxation pressure (IRP) on high-resolution manometry before lung transplantation (LTx). After IRB approval, we reviewed data on LTRs who underwent LTx between January 2019 and August 2022 with a preoperative median IRP >15 mmHg. Differences in overall survival and chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD)-free survival between LTRs with a normalized median IRP after LTx (N-IRP) and those with persistently high IRP (PH-IRP) were assessed using Kaplan-Meier curves and the log-rank test. During the study period, 352 LTx procedures were performed; 44 (12.5%) LTRs had an elevated IRP before LTx, and 37 (84.1%) completed a postoperative manometry assessment (24 [70.6%] males; mean age, 65.2 ± 9.1 years). The median IRP before and after LTx was 18.7 ± 3.8 mmHg and 12 ± 5.6 mmHg, respectively (P < 0.001); the median IRP normalized after LTx in 24 (64.9%) patients. Two-year overall survival trended lower in the N-IRP group than the PH-IRP group (77.2% vs. 92.3%, P = 0.086), but CLAD-free survival (P = 0.592) and rates of primary graft dysfunction (P = 0.502) and acute cellular rejection (P = 0.408) were similar. An abnormally elevated IRP was common in LTx candidates; however, it normalized in roughly two-thirds of patients after LTx. Two-year survival trended higher in the PH-IRP group, despite similar rates of primary graft dysfunction and acute cellular rejection as well as similar CLAD-free survival between the groups.

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