Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Patient-reported Outcome Measure (PROM) Rand-36-item Health Survey for Gallstone Disease Patients Five Years Following Surgery: A Prospective Randomized Study.

In Vivo 2024
BACKGROUND/AIM: There are no studies assessing the long-term quality of life (QoL) following three-dimensional laparoscopy cholecystectomy (3D-LC) in patients with cholelithiasis (Chole).

PATIENTS AND METHODS: A cohort of 200 patients with Chole were randomized into 3D-LC or minilaparotomy cholecystectomy (MC) groups. RAND-36 survey was performed before randomization, four weeks and five years postoperatively.

RESULTS: Similar postoperative five years RAND-36 scores were reported in the 3D-LC and MC groups. The MC and 3D-LC groups combined analysis, social functioning (SF, p=0.007), mental health (MH, p=0.001), role physical (RP, p<0.001) and bodily pain (BP, p<0.001) domains increased significantly. In comparison to the Finnish reference RAND-36 (FRR) scores, the scores at five years increased significantly in the MH domain, while four RAND-36 domains; Physical functioning (PF), general health (GH), RP, BP remained significantly lower in comparison to the FRR scores.

CONCLUSION: A relatively similar long-term outcome in the 3D-LC and MC patients is shown. Interestingly, five RAND-36 domains increased during five years follow-up, while four RAND-36 domains remained lower than FRR scores, which may indicate onset of possible new symptoms following cholecystectomy in long-term follow-up.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app