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Design, In silico study, Synthesis and Evaluation of Hybrid Pyrazole Substituted 1,3,5-Triazine Derivatives for Antimalarial Activity.

OBJECTIVES: Malaria is a significant global health challenge, particularly in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, necessitating immediate investigation into innovative and efficacious treatments. This work involves the development of pyrazole substituted 1,3,5-triazine derivatives as antimalarial agent.

METHODS: In this study, ten compounds 7(a-j) were synthesized by using nucleophilic substitution reaction, screened for in silico study and their antimalarial activity were evaluated against 3D7 (chloroquine-sensitive) strain of P. falciparum.

KEY FINDING: The present work involves the development of hybrid trimethoxy pyrazole 1,3,5-triazine derivatives 7 (a-j). Through in silico analysis, four compounds were identified with favorable binding energy and dock scores. The primary focus of the docking investigations was on the examination of hydrogen bonding and the associated interactions with certain amino acid residues, including Arg A122, Ser A108, Ser A111, Ile A164, Asp A54, and Cys A15. The IC50 values of the four compounds were measured in vitro to assess their antimalarial activity against the chloroquine sensitive 3D7 strain of P. falciparum. The IC50 values varied from 25.02 to 54.82 μg/mL.

CONCLUSION: Among the ten derivatives, compound 7J has considerable potential as an antimalarial agent, making it a viable contender for further refinement in the realm of pharmaceutical exploration, with the aim of mitigating the global malaria load.

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