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Relationship Between Dentofacial Features and Bullying in School children.

Pediatric Dentistry 2024 March 16
Purpose: The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the association between clinician-assessed (actual) and self-assessed (perceived) dentofacial features and their association with bullying in schoolchildren. Methods: The sample comprised 519 schoolchildren aged 10 to 12 years old (235 boys and 284 girls) randomly selected from private and public schools. Clinical evaluations were performed to record dento- facial features, and the children were asked a self-reported questionnaire about their personal experience of bullying and perceived dentofacial features. Descriptive statistics (counts and percentages) as well as chi-square to analyze the association between variables were applied. Results: The results showed that 57.2 percent of the children reported being bullied, and the mainly perceived dentofacial features cited were: "crooked teeth" (46.3 percent), "shape or color of teeth" (45.5 percent), "upper front teeth sticking out" (43.8 percent), and "having a gap between the teeth or having missing teeth" (35.5 percent). Statistically significant associations between actual and perceived dentofacial features and involve- ment in bullying were observed for anterior crowding (P=0.01), anterior crossbite (P<0.001), lip competence (P=0.008), and anterior dental trauma (P=0.04). Conclusion: Some actual and perceived dentofacial traits are associated with bullying, so these features and the schoolchil- dren's compliances should be considered to determine the treatment need.

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