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Body weight variability and the risk of liver-related outcomes in type 2 diabetes and steatotic liver disease: a cohort study.

Obesity 2024 April 26
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of body weight variability (BWV) on the occurrence of adverse liver outcomes in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease (MASLD).

METHODS: A total of 549 patients with T2D and MASLD had BWV parameters assessed during the first 2 years of follow-up. The associations between increasing BWV and liver outcomes (clinical cirrhosis or a liver stiffness measurement on transient elastography > 15 kPa, performed after a median of 7 years of cohort entry) were examined by multivariable logistic regressions. Interaction/subgroup analyses were performed according to participants' physical activity during the initial 2-year period.

RESULTS: Individuals were followed up for an additional median 9.7 years, over which 34 liver outcomes occurred (14 with clinical cirrhosis and 20 with liver stiffness measurement > 15 kPa). A 1-SD increase in weight SD and average real variability was associated with 52% higher (95% CI: 4%-128%) odds of having an adverse liver outcome. Otherwise, in interaction/subgroup analyses, an increased BWV was associated with a higher likelihood of outcomes only in sedentary individuals.

CONCLUSIONS: Increased BWV was associated with adverse liver outcomes in individuals with T2D and MASLD; however, in those who were physically active, it was not hazardous.

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