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Frequent Amplification and Overexpression of PSMA in Basallike Breast Cancer from Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas.

Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is frequently overexpressed in nonprostate malignancies. This preclinical study investigated the molecular basis of the application of PMSA-targeting radiopharmaceuticals in breast cancer subtypes. Methods: The somatic copy number status and the transcriptomic and protein expressions of FOLH1 (gene name of PSMA) were analyzed across breast cancer subtypes in 998 patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset. Results: FOLH1 was frequently amplified in basallike breast cancer (BLBC) (32%) compared with luminal and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive subtypes (16% and 17%, respectively; P < 0.01). FOLH1 expression was higher in BLBC ( P < 0.001) and was negatively correlated with estrogen-receptor and progesterone-receptor expressions. Consistently, the PSMA protein level was higher in BLBC ( P < 0.05). Interestingly, FOLH1 expression was associated with relapse-free and distant metastasis-free survival in patients with BLBC. Conclusion: The BLBC subtype exhibited frequent amplification and overexpression of PSMA, supporting the exploration of PSMA-targeting radiopharmaceuticals in this aggressive breast cancer subtype.

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