Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Magnetic resonance enterography findings 46 weeks after initiation of biological therapy predict long-term adverse outcomes in Crohn's disease.

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) depicts transmural changes in response to biological treatment for Crohn's disease (CD); however, the long-term prognostic significance of these findings is unknown. The primary objective of this study was to identify findings on MRE 46 weeks after initiating biological treatment that predict adverse long-term outcomes.

METHODS: Patients with CD underwent MRE 46 weeks after initiating biological treatment and were prospectively followed for 2 years. A logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the prognostic value of different radiologic findings for various predefined adverse outcomes.

RESULTS: Of the 89 patients included, 46 (51.7%) had ≥1 adverse outcome during follow-up: 40 (44.9%) had clinical recurrence; 18 (20.2%) required surgery, 8 (9%) endoscopic balloon dilation, 12 (13.5%) hospitalization and 7 (7.8%) required corticosteroids. In the multivariate analysis, persistence of severe lesions (MaRIA ≥11) in any intestinal segment was associated with an increased risk of surgery [OR 11.6 (1.5-92.4)], of surgery and/or endoscopic balloon dilation [OR 6.3 (1.3-30.2)], and of clinical relapse [OR 4.6 (1.6-13.9)]. Penetrating lesions were associated with surgery [OR 3.4 (1.2-9.9)]. Creeping fat with hospitalization [OR 5.1 (1.1-25.0)] and corticosteroids requirement [OR 16.0 (1.2-210.0)]. The presence of complications (stricturing and/or penetrating lesions) was associated with having ≥1 adverse outcome [OR 3.35 (1.3-8.5)].

CONCLUSION: MRE findings at week-46 after initiating biological therapy can predict long-term adverse outcomes in CD. Therapeutic intervention may be required in patients with persistence of severe inflammatory lesions, CD-associated complications, or creeping fat.

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