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Higher serum carotenoid concentrations were associated with the lower risk of cancer-related death: Evidence from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Nutrition Research 2024 March 31
The study focuses on the association between serum carotenoids and cancer-related death. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2001-2006 and 2017-2018), the study encompasses 10,277 participants older than age 20 years, with recorded baseline characteristics and serum carotenoid concentrations (including α-carotene, trans-β-carotene, cis-β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, trans-lycopene, and lutein/zeaxanthin). We hypothesized that serum carotenoid concentrations were negatively associated with cancer-related death. The weighted chi-square analyses indicate significant negative correlations between higher serum concentrations of α-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, trans-lycopene, and total carotenoids, and the risk of cancer-related deaths. Using weighted Cox regression analysis, this study confirms that α-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, trans-lycopene, and total carotenoids, as continuous or categorical variables, are inversely related to cancer mortality (P < .0001). Furthermore, considering competitive risk events, lower concentrations of serum β-cryptoxanthin (Fine-Gray P = 1.12e-04), trans-lycopene (P = 5.68e-14), and total carotenoids (P = .03) are associated with an increased risk of cancer-related deaths. The research reveals a crucial inverse relationship between serum carotenoid concentrations and cancer-related death.

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