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Hand differences in aiming task: a complementary spatial approach and analysis ofdynamic brain networks with EEG.

Left and right-hand exhibit differences in the execution of movements. Particularly, it has been shown that manual goal-directed aiming is more accurate with the right hand than with the left, which has been explained through the shorter time spent by the right hand in the feedback phase (FB). This explanation makes sense for the temporal aspects of the task; however, there is a lack of explanations for the spatial aspects. The present study hypothesizes that the right hand is more associated with the FB, while the left hand is more strongly associated with the pre-programming phase (PP). In addition, the present study aims to investigate differences between hands in functional brain connectivity (FBC). We hypothesize an increase in FBC of the right hand compared to the left hand. Twenty-two participants performed 20 trials of the goal-directed aiming task with both hands. Overall, the results confirm the study's hypotheses. Although the right hand stopped far from the target at the PP, it exhibited a lower final position error than the left hand. These findings imply that during the FB, the right hand compensates for the higher error observed in the PP, using the visual feedback to approach the target more closely than the left hand. Conversely, the left hand displayed a lower error at the PP than the right. Also, the right hand displayed greater FBC within and between brain hemispheres. This heightened connectivity in the right hand might be associated with inhibitory mechanisms between hemispheres.

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