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Evaluation of prediabetes patients in terms of metabolic syndrome.

OBJECTIVE: Prediabetes accompanied by metabolic syndrome accelerates the process leading to diabetes and causes an increase in complications. The current study aimed to investigate the clinical conditions accompanying prediabetes and the effect of the association of metabolic syndrome on clinical outcomes in prediabetics.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted with 88 prediabetic individuals between November 2022 and January 2023. Prediabetes was diagnosed using the American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria, and metabolic syndrome was diagnosed using the International Diabetes Federation criteria. Clinical history, physical examination and laboratory tests of the participants were recorded.

RESULTS: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) was present in 69 of 88 prediabetic patients included in the study (78.4%). Hypertension (p=0.019), abdominal obesity (p<0.001), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) elevation (p=0.006), and dyslipidemia (p=0.020) were detected more frequently in prediabetic individuals accompanied by MetS. Median values of waist circumference (p=0.020), systolic blood pressure (p=0.021), triglyceride (p<0.001), LDL (p=0.003) and postprandial blood sugar (p=0.049) in prediabetics accompanied by MetS were statistically significant. It was higher than those without MetS. The median Vit-D level of prediabetics without MetS was higher than those with MetS (p=0.049). The median creatinine value of prediabetics without MetS was higher than that of prediabetics with MetS (p=0.049).

CONCLUSIONS: Hypertension, dyslipidemia, abdominal obesity, and metabolic obesity increased in the coexistence of prediabetes and MetS. At the same time, the coexistence of prediabetes and MetS was associated with higher systolic blood pressure, postprandial blood sugar, and LDL levels. Prediabetic individuals accompanied by MetS are at greater metabolic risk.

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