Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Helminth-derived proteins as immune system regulators: a systematic review of their promise in alleviating colitis.

BMC Immunology 2024 April 19
Helminth-derived proteins have immunomodulatory properties, influencing the host's immune response as an adaptive strategy for helminth survival. Helminth-derived proteins modulate the immune response by inducing anti-inflammatory cytokines, promoting regulatory T-cell development, and ultimately favouring a Th2-biased immune response. This systematic review focused on helminth-derived proteins and explored their impact on reducing inflammatory responses in mouse models of colitis. A systematic search across Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library identified fourteen relevant studies. These studies reported immunomodulatory changes, including increased production of anti-inflammatory cells and cytokines. In mouse models of colitis treated with on helminth-derived proteins, significant improvements in pathological parameters such as body weight, colon length, and microscopic inflammatory scores were observed compared to control groups. Moreover, helminth-derived proteins can enhance the function of Tregs and alleviate the severity of inflammatory conditions. The findings underscore the pivotal role of helminth-derived proteins in immunomodulation, specifically in the axis of cytokine secretion and immune cell polarization. The findings offer new opportunities for treating chronic inflammatory conditions such Crohn's disease.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app