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Systemic immune-inflammation index is associated with cardiac complications following acute ischemic stroke: A retrospective single-center study.

BACKGROUND: Stroke-induced heart syndrome is a feared complication of ischemic stroke, that is commonly encountered and has a strong association with unfavorable prognosis. More research is needed to explore underlying mechanisms and inform clinical decision making. This study aims to explore the relationship between the early systemic immune-inflammation (SII) index and the cardiac complications after acute ischemic stroke.

METHODS: Consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke were prospectively collected from January 2020 to August 2022 and retrospectively analyzed. We included subjects who presented within 24 hours after symptom onset and were free of detectable infections or cancer on admission. SII index [(neutrophils × platelets/ lymphocytes)/1000] was calculated from laboratory data at admission.

RESULTS: A total of 121 patients were included in our study, of which 24 (19.8 %) developed cardiac complications within 14 days following acute ischemic stroke. The SII level was found higher in patients with stroke-heart syndrome (p<.001), which was an independent predictor of stroke-heart syndrome (adjusted odds ratio 5.089, p=.002).

CONCLUSION: New-onset cardiovascular complications diagnosed following a stroke are very common and are associated with early SII index.

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