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PANoptosis Features, a Humanized NSG Murine Model of Sjogren's Syndrome.

DNA and Cell Biology 2024 April 19
Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is a complex systemic autoimmune disease. This study aims to elucidate a humanized NOD-Prkdcscid Il2rgem1 /Smoc (NSG) murine model to better clarify the pathogenesis of SS. NSG female mice were adoptively transferred with 10 million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) through the tail vein from healthy controls (HCs), primary Sjogren's syndrome (pSS), and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients on D0. The mice were subcutaneously injected with C57/B6j submandibular gland (SG) protein or phosphate-buffered saline on D3, D17 and D31, respectively. NSG mice were successfully transplanted with human PBMCs. Compared with NSG-HC group, NSG-pSS and NSG-SLE mice exhibited a large number of lymphocytes infiltration in the SG, decreased salivary flow rate, lung involvement, decreased expression of genes related to salivary secretion, and the production of autoantibodies. Type I interferon-related genes were increased in the SG of NSG-pSS and NSG-SLE mice. The ratio of BAX/BCL2, BAX, cleaved caspase3, and TUNEL staining were increased in the SG of NSG-pSS and NSG-SLE mice. The expressions of p-MLKL and p-RIPK3 were increased in the SG of NSG-pSS and NSG-SLE mice. Increased expression of type I interferon-related genes, PANoptosis (apoptosis and necroptosis) were identified in the SG of this typical humanized NSG murine model of SS.

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