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Role of oral health in heart and vascular health: A population-based study.

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Conditions such as hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, and hypercholesterolemia, are a major public health challenge. This study investigates the influence of oral health indicators, including gum bleeding, active dental caries, tooth mobility, and tooth loss, on their prevalence in Hungary, considering socioeconomic, demographic, and lifestyle factors.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data from the 2019 Hungarian European Health Interview Survey with 5,603 participants informed this analysis. Data were accessed from the records maintained by the Department of Health Informatics at the University of Debrecen between September and November 2023. Variable selection employed elastic net regularization and k-fold cross-validation, leading to high-performing predictors for weighted multiple logistic regression models. Sensitivity analysis confirmed the findings' validity.

RESULTS: Significant links were found between poor oral health and chronic cardiac conditions. Multiple teeth extractions increased hypertension risk (OR = 1.67, 95% CI: [1.01-2.77]); dental prosthetics had an OR of 1.45 [1.20-1.75]. Gum bleeding was associated with higher cardiovascular disease (OR = 1.69 [1.30-2.21]) and hypercholesterolemia risks (OR = 1.40 [1.09-1.81]).

CONCLUSIONS: Oral health improvement may reduce the risk of cardiac conditions. This underscores oral health's role in multidisciplinary disease management.

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