Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Obesity, Inflammation, and Clinical Outcomes in COVID-19: A Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study.

CONTEXT: Obesity is a risk factor for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-related outcomes; however, the mechanism remains unclear.

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this analysis was to determine whether inflammation mediates the association between obesity and COVID-19 outcomes.

DESIGN: The International Study of Inflammation in Covid-19 (ISIC): A Prospective Multi-Center Observational Study Examining the Role of Biomarkers of Inflammation in Predicting Covid-19 Related Outcomes in Hospitalized Patients.

SETTING: Ten hospitals in the United States and Europe.

PARTICIPANTS: Adults hospitalized specifically for COVID-19 between February 1, 2020, through October 19, 2022.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Inflammatory biomarkers, including soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), were measured at admission. Associations were examined between body-mass index (BMI, kg/m2) and a composite of death, need for mechanical ventilation, and renal replacement therapy, stratified by pre- and post-Omicron variants. The contribution of inflammation to the relationship between obesity and outcomes was assessed.

RESULTS: Among 4644 participants (mean age 59.3, 45.6% male, 21.8% BMI≥35), those with BMI>40 (n=485) had 55% higher odds of the composite outcome (95% CI[1.21 to 1.98]) compared to non-obese individuals (BMI<30, n=2358) in multivariable analysis. In multiple mediation analysis, only suPAR remained a significant mediator between BMI and composite outcome. Associations were amplified for participants younger than 65 years and with pre-Omicron variants.

CONCLUSION: Obesity is associated with worse outcomes in COVID-19, notably in younger participants and in the pre-Omicron era. Inflammation, as measured by suPAR, is a significant mediator of the association between obesity and COVID-19 outcomes.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app