Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Inflammatory Gene Panel Guiding the Study of Genetics in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex disease that develops through a sequence of molecular events that are still poorly defined. This process is driven by a multitude of context-dependent genes that play different roles based on their environment. The complexity and multi-faceted nature of these genes make it difficult to study the genetic basis of IBD. The goal of this article is to review the key genes in the pathophysiology of IBD and highlight new technology that can be used in further research. This paper examines Nanostring RNA probe technology, which uses tissue analyzed without the use of enzymes, transcription, or amplification. Nanostring offers several panels of genes to test, including an inflammation panel of 234 genes. This article analyzes this panel and reviews the literature for each gene's effect in IBD for use as a framework to review the pathophysiology of the disease. The panel was narrowed to 26 genes with significant evidence of mechanistic potential in IBD, which were then categorized into specific areas of pathogenesis. These include gut barrier breakdown, inappropriate recognition of commensal bacteria, immune cell activation, proinflammatory cytokine release, and subsequent impairment of the anti-inflammatory response. The eventual goal of this paper is the creation of a customized panel of IBD genes that can be used to better understand the genetic mechanism of IBD and aid in the development of future therapies in IBD.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app