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Prognostic impact of osteosarcopenia in patients undergoing pancreatic resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

BACKGROUND: We investigated the prognostic impact of osteosarcopenia, defined as the combination of osteopenia and sarcopenia, in patients undergoing pancreatic resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC).

METHODS: The relationship of osteosarcopenia with disease-free survival and overall survival was analyzed in 183 patients who underwent elective pancreatic resection for PDAC. Computed tomography was used to measure the pixel density in the midvertebral core of the 11th thoracic vertebra for evaluation of osteopenia and in the psoas muscle area of the 3rd lumbar vertebra for evaluation of sarcopenia. Osteosarcopenia was defined as the simultaneous presence of both osteopenia and sarcopenia. The study employed a retrospective design to examine the relationship between osteosarcopenia and survival outcomes.

RESULTS: Osteosarcopenia was identified in 61 (33%) patients. In the univariate analysis, disease-free survival was significantly worse in patients with male sex (p = 0.031), pathological stage ≥ III PDAC (p = 0.001), NLR, ≥ 2.71 (p = 0.041), sarcopenia (p = 0.027), osteopenia (p = 0.001), and osteosarcopenia (p < 0.001), and overall survival was significantly worse in patients with male sex (p = 0.001), pathological stage ≥ III PDAC (p = 0.001), distal pancreatectomy (p = 0.025), sarcopenia (p = 0.003), osteopenia (p < 0.001), and osteosarcopenia (p < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, the independent predictors of disease-free survival were osteosarcopenia (p < 0.001) and pathological stage ≥ III PDAC (p = 0.002), and the independent predictors of overall survival were osteosarcopenia (p < 0.001), male sex (p = 0.006) and pathological stage ≥ III PDAC (p = 0.001).

CONCLUSION: Osteosarcopenia has an adverse prognostic impact on long-term outcomes in patients undergoing pancreatic resection for PDAC.

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