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Association Between Polymorphisms in DNA Damage Repair Pathway Genes and Female Breast Cancer Risk.

DNA and Cell Biology 2024 April 18
Breast cancer risk have been discussed to be associated with polymorphisms in genes as well as abnormal DNA damage repair function. This study aims to assess the relationship between genes single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to DNA damage repair and female breast cancer risk in Chinese population. A case-control study containing 400 patients and 400 healthy controls was conducted. Genotype was identified using the sequence MassARRAY method and expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) in tumor tissues was analyzed by immunohistochemistry assay. The results revealed that ATR rs13091637 decreased breast cancer risk influenced by ER, PR (CT/TT vs. CC: adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04-2.27, p  = 0.032; CT/TT vs. CC: adjusted OR = 1.63, 95%CI: 1.14-2.35, p  = 0.008) expression. Stratified analysis revealed that PALB2 rs16940342 increased breast cancer risk in response to menstrual status (AG/GG vs. AA: adjusted OR = 1.72, 95%CI: 1.13-2.62, p  = 0.011) and age of menarche (AG/GG vs. AA: adjusted OR = 1.54, 95%CI: 1.03-2.31, p  = 0.037), whereas ATM rs611646 and Ku70 rs132793 were associated with reduced breast cancer risk influenced by menarche (GA/AA vs. GG: adjusted OR = 0.50, 95%CI: 0.30-0.95, p  = 0.033). In a summary, PALB2 rs16940342, ATR rs13091637, ATM rs611646, and Ku70 rs132793 were associated with breast cancer risk.

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