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Cost-effectiveness of high-dose influenza vaccination in the Netherlands: Incorporating the impact on both respiratory and cardiovascular hospitalizations.

Vaccine 2024 April 18
OBJECTIVES: We assess the cost-effectiveness of switching from standard-dose quadrivalent influenza vaccination (SD-QIV) to high-dose vaccination (HD-QIV) for Dutch adults aged 60 years and older.

METHODS: A health-economic model was used to compare the scenario where HD-QIV was implemented compared to the current standard, SD-QIV. This model used a lifetime horizon and assessed the cost-effectiveness from a societal perspective. A recently published meta-analysis was used to incorporate the benefits of HD-QIV, including cardiorespiratory hospitalizations, in analyses considering RCT only or combining RCT and RWE estimates in a scenario analysis.

RESULTS: Implementing HD-QIV is cost effective at its list price, with an ICER of €5,400 per QALY gained. The main driver of these results is the prevention of cardiorespiratory hospitalizations. Other public health benefits are the prevention of GP consults and deaths. HD-QIV is highly likely to be cost-effective, reaching a 100% probability of being cost effective at the Dutch willingness-to-pay threshold of €20,000 per QALY.

CONCLUSIONS: Implementing HD-QIV for adults aged 60 and over within the existing influenza vaccination campaign is highly cost effective. HD-QIV may support alleviating potential capacity issues in Dutch hospitals in the winter respiratory season.

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