Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Neural responses to gaming content on social media in young adults.

Excessive gaming can impair both mental and physical health, drawing widespread public and clinical attention, especially among young generations. People are now more exposed to gaming-related content on social media than before, and this exposure may have a significant impact on their behavior. However, the neural mechanisms underlying this effect remain unexplored. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), this study aimed to investigate the neural activity induced by gaming-related content on social media among young adults casually playing online games. While being assessed by fMRI, the participants watched gaming-related videos and neutral (nongaming) videos on social media. The gaming-related cues significantly activated several brain areas, including the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, superior/middle temporal gyrus, precuneus and occipital regions, compared with the neutral cues. Additionally, the participants' gaming desire levels positively correlated with a gaming-related cue-induced activation in the left orbitofrontal cortex and the right superior temporal gyrus. These findings extend previous studies on gaming cues and provide useful information to elucidate the effects of gaming-related content on social media in young adults. Continued research using real-world gaming cues may help improve our understanding of promoting gaming habits and provide support to individuals vulnerable to gaming addiction.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app