Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Lead/Lag directionality is not generally equivalent to causality in nonlinear systems: Comparison of phase slope index and conditional mutual information.

NeuroImage 2024 April 16
Applications of causal techniques to neural time series have increased extensively over last decades, including a wide and diverse family of methods focusing on electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis. Besides connectivity inferred in defined frequency bands, there is a growing interest in the analysis of cross-frequency interactions, in particular phase and amplitude coupling and directionality. Some studies show contradicting results of coupling directionality from high frequency to low frequency signal components, in spite of generally considered modulation of a high-frequency amplitude by a low-frequency phase. We have compared two widely used methods to estimate the directionality in cross frequency coupling: conditional mutual information (CMI) and phase slope index (PSI). The latter, applied to infer cross-frequency phase-amplitude directionality from animal intracranial recordings, gives opposite results when comparing to CMI. Both metrics were tested in a numerically simulated example of unidirectionally coupled Rössler systems, which helped to find the explanation of the contradictory results: PSI correctly estimates the lead/lag relationship which, however, is not generally equivalent to causality in the sense of directionality of coupling in nonlinear systems, correctly inferred by using CMI with surrogate data testing.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app