Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Mast cells: a novel therapeutic avenue for cardiovascular diseases?

Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells strategically located in different compartments of the normal human heart (the myocardium, pericardium, aortic valve and close to nerves) as well as in atherosclerotic plaques. Cardiac mast cells produce a broad spectrum of vasoactive and proinflammatory mediators, which have potential roles in inflammation, angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, tissue remodeling and fibrosis. Mast cells release preformed mediators (e.g., histamine, tryptase, chymase) and de novo synthesized mediators [e.g., cysteinyl leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2)], as well as cytokines and chemokines, which can activate different resident immune cells (e.g., macrophages) and structural cells (e.g., fibroblasts, endothelial cells) in the human heart and aorta. The transcriptional profiles of various mast cell populations highlight their potential heterogeneity and distinct gene and proteome expression. Mast cell plasticity and/or heterogeneity enable these cells the potential for performing different, even opposite, functions in response to changing tissue contexts. Human cardiac mast cells display significant differences compared to mast cells isolated from other organs. These characteristics make cardiac mast cells intriguing, given their dichotomous potential roles of inducing or protecting against cardiovascular diseases. Identification of cardiac mast cell subpopulations represents a prerequisite for understanding their potential multifaceted roles in health and disease. Several new drugs specifically targeting human mast cell activation are under development or in clinical trials. Mast cells and/or their subpopulations can potentially represent novel therapeutic targets for cardiovascular disorders.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app