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New Treatment modality for Burn Injury Related ARDS : High-Flow Nasal Oxygen Therapy in Major Burns.

Pulmonary insufficiency is the primary cause of death in cases of major burns accompanied by inhalation damage. It is important to consider the impact on the face and neck in flame burns. Early implementation of bronchial hygiene measures and oxygenation treatment in inhalation injury can reduce mortality. This case series presents the effects of high-flow nasal oxygen application on patient outcomes in major burns and inhalation injury. This report discusses three different patients. One patient, a 29-year-old male with 35% TBSA burns, received high-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) treatment for inhalation injury on the sixth day after the trauma. After 72 hours of HFNO application, the patient's pulmonary symptoms improved. The second patient had 60% TBSA burns and developed respiratory distress symptoms on the fifth day after the trauma. After 7 days of HFNO application, all symptoms and findings of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were resolved. HFNO has used for the treatment of ARDS releated to major burn ( 60% of burned TBSA) 28 years-old patient and improvement was achived. The use of HFNO in pulmonary insufficiency among burn patients has not been reported previously. This series of patient cases demonstrates the successful application of HFNO in treating inhalation injury and burn-related ARDS. However, further clinical studies are necessary to increase its clinical utilization.

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