Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Extracellular vesicles as potential diagnostic markers for kidney allograft rejection.

Kidney transplantation is a highly effective treatment for end-stage kidney disease. However, allograft rejection remains a significant clinical challenge in kidney transplant patients. Although kidney allograft biopsy is the gold-standard diagnostic method, it is an invasive procedure. Since the current monitoring methods, including screening of serum creatinine and urinary protein, are not of sufficient sensitivity, there is a need for effective post-transplant monitoring to detect allograft rejection at an early stage. Extracellular vesicles are vesicles with a lipid bilayer that originate from different cell types in pathological and physiological conditions. The content of extracellular vesicles reflects the status of cells at the time of their production. This review comprehensively summarizes clinical, in vivo, and in vitro reports that highlight the potential of extracellular vesicles as diagnostic biomarkers for kidney allograft rejection. Clarification would facilitate differentiation between rejection and non-rejection and identification of the mechanisms involved in the allograft rejection. Despite increasing evidence, further research is necessary to establish the clinical utility of extracellular vesicles in the diagnosis and monitoring of allograft rejection in kidney transplant recipients. Using extracellular vesicles as non-invasive biomarkers for diagnosis of kidney allograft rejection could have tremendous benefits in improving patient outcomes and reduce the need for invasive procedures.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app