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Immunogenicity of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine among Alaska Native children aged 9-14 years at 5 years after vaccination.

Vaccine 2024 April 16
BACKGROUND: Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection can cause anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. Many HPV infections and HPV-associated cancers are vaccine-preventable. Studies suggest long-term persistence of vaccine-induced antibodies. However, data are limited among Alaska Native people.

METHODS: During 2011-2014, we enrolled Alaska Native children aged 9-14 years who received a 3-dose series of quadrivalent HPV vaccine (4vHPV). We collected sera at 1 month and 1, 2, 3, and 5 years post-vaccination to evaluate trends in type-specific immunoglobulin G antibody concentrations for the 4vHPV types (HPV 6/11/16/18).

RESULTS: All participants (N = 469) had detectable antibodies against all 4vHPV types at all timepoints post-vaccination. For all 4vHPV types, antibody levels peaked by 1 month post-vaccination and gradually declined in subsequent years. At 5 years post-vaccination, antibody levels were higher among children who received 4vHPV at a younger age.

CONCLUSIONS: Alaska Native children maintained antibodies against all 4vHPV types at 5 years post-vaccination.

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