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Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS): challenges in diagnosis and management.

BMJ Case Reports 2024 April 17
Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a rare, congenital functional intestinal obstruction, characterised by megacystis (bladder distention in the absence of mechanical obstruction), microcolon and intestinal hypoperistalsis (dysmotility).We are reporting a case of a female child with normal antenatal course who presented with recurrent episodes of abdominal distension since the second day of life and underwent negative exploratory laparotomy on multiple occasions. She also had urinary retention with a grossly distended bladder, requiring drainage by clean intermittent catheterisation. Surgical procedures for bowel decompression, including gastrostomy and ileostomy, were carried out without success. Genetic analysis revealed a mutation in the human smooth muscle (enteric) gamma-actin gene (ACTG2 gene), clinching the diagnosis of MMIHS. The patient was managed with parenteral nutrition and prokinetic medications and tolerated jejunostomy feeds for a brief period before she succumbed to the illness.Female neonates or infants presenting with abdominal distension and dilated urinary tract should be investigated for MMIHS early on. A timely diagnosis will enable the early involvement of a multidisciplinary team to provide the best options available for management.

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